About

KEYWORDS IN SOUND
David Novak and Matt Sakakeeny, editors

“There is not a separate entry for ‘SOUND.’ Instead, this über- keyword emerges as a semiotic web, woven by the complementarities and tensions of their entanglements in different intellectual histories.”
  – INTRODUCTION

ACOUSTEMOLOGY
“Acoustemology asks how the physicality of sound is so instantly and forcefully present to experience and experiencers, to interpreters and interpretations.”

STEVEN FELD
Distinguished Professor, Anthropology and Music, University of New Mexico

ACOUSTICS
“Acoustics is a way of knowing about sound, one that brings into focus quantifiable aspects of the matter, force, and motion involved with it.”

BENJAMIN STEEGE
Assistant Professor, Music, Columbia University

BODY
“Sound knowledge circulates in the ‘feedback’ between body and body, body and environment, body and machine.”

DEBORAH KAPCHAN
Associate Professor, Performance Studies, NYU

DEAFNESS
“Deafness is a variety of hearing; alternately, it can be conceived as a precondition of hearing or as the resistance to hearing and audism.”

MARA MILLS
Assistant Professor, Media, Culture and Communication, NYU

ECHO
“Echo is a faded facsimile of an original sound, a reflection of time passed.”

MARK M. SMITH
Carolina Distinguished Professor, History, University of South Carolina

HEARING
“Without ears to hear it, there is no sound.”

JONATHAN STERNE
James McGill Chair, Culture and Technology, McGill University

IMAGE
“Why would sound studies have necessary recourse to a concept more typically to be found in the disciplines of art history or literary studies?”

JOHN MOWITT
Professor, Chair of Critical Humanities, University of Leeds

LANGUAGE
“Sound studies can enter into critical dialogue with an intellectual history that has largely emphasized language’s cognitive properties at the expense of its sonic enactments.”

DAVID SAMUELS
Associate Professor, Music, NYU

THOMAS PORCELLO
Professor, Anthropology, Vassar College

LISTENING
“A person may listen to something intently, absorbed in the sound, but distracted, indifferent, deconcentrated, or even unconscious listening are also possible.”

TOM RICE
Lecturer, Anthropology, University of Exeter

MUSIC
“Music is an idea, not just a form, and like any other idea, music is a problem.”

MATT SAKAKEENY
Associate Professor, Music, Tulane

NOISE
Noise is a powerful antisubject of culture, raising essential questions about the staging of human expression, socialization, individual subjectivity, and political control.”

DAVID NOVAK
Associate Professor, Music, University of California, Santa Barbara

PHONOGRAPHY
“Phonography combines the Greek phonē (sound,voice) with graphē (writing).”

PATRICK FEASTER
Independent Scholar

RADIO
“While radio often disappears into the background, moving to the limits of awareness as a supplement to that which it mediates, it also frequently reasserts itself as a force in social life that provokes reflection on mediation.”

DANIEL FISHER
Assistant Professor, Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley

RELIGION
“The ear is far more than a simple entryway for a divine message. Rather, it is the practical and conceptual site where the task of molding the human senses in accord with the demands of a religious tradition is to be carried out.”

CHARLES HIRSCHKIND
Associate Professor, Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley

RESONANCE
“To retrace the hidden history of resonance promises to provide fresh insight into the role of sound in Western thought and cultural practice, a role that has been overlooked by predominantly ocularcentric discourses and paradigms.”

VEIT ERLMANN
Endowed Chair of Music History, Music, University of Texas at Austin

SILENCE
“The tension between the apparent acoustic impossibility of silence and the intensely contrasting experiences it provokes lies at the heart of the types of presence and affect invoked by the term.”

ANA MARÍA OCHOA GAUTHIER
Associate Professor, Music/Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, Columbia University

SPACE
“Imagine sound without space, vibrating everywhere and nowhere.”

ANDREW EISENBERG
Visiting Assistant Professor, Music, NYU Abu Dhabi

SYNTHESIS
“The history of sound synthesis manifests the renewable promises of technologies to improve on what presents itself in nature.”

TARA RODGERS
Independent Scholar and Composer

TRANSDUCTION
“A loudspeaker is a transducer. A microphone is a transducer. A telephone is a transducer. During the twentieth century, the human ear came itself to be described as a transducer.”

STEFAN HELMREICH
Elting E. Morison Professor, Anthropology, MIT

VOICE
“Almost before we can speak of the sound itself, we attribute the voice to someone or something.”

AMANDA WEIDMAN
Associate Professor, Anthropology, Bryn Mawr

The book is available for purchase through your local bookstore or online retailers. Order direct from Duke Press and get 30% off w/code E15SOUND. (Phone or email orders only.)